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File #: 2020-0337    Version:
Type: Ordinance Status: Passed
File created: 9/29/2020 In control: Committee of the Whole
On agenda: Final action: 10/13/2020
Enactment date: 10/13/2020 Enactment #: 19179
Title: AN ORDINANCE imposing an additional sales and use tax of one-tenth of one percent, as authorized in RCW 82.14.530; adding a new chapter to K.C.C. Title 4A; and declaring an emergency.
Sponsors: Joe McDermott, Dave Upthegrove, Rod Dembowski, Girmay Zahilay, Claudia Balducci, Jeanne Kohl-Welles
Indexes: Homelessness, Housing, Taxes
Code sections: 4A - .
Attachments: 1. Ordinance 19179, 2. 2020-0337_JM_Amd0.5_emergencydeclarationFINAL, 3. 2020-0337_Amd0.75_KL, 4. 2020-0337_JM_t1_emergencyFINAL, 5. 2020-0319&0337_HousingSalesTax_SR.docx, 6. 2020-0319 & 0337 ATT5 2020-0311 Fiscal Note.pdf, 7. 2020-0337 Combined Public Comment 10-6 COW.pdf, 8. 2020-0337 Public Comment no. 2 for 10-6 COW.pdf
Staff: Sanders, April
Title
AN ORDINANCE imposing an additional sales and use tax of one-tenth of one percent, as authorized in RCW 82.14.530; adding a new chapter to K.C.C. Title 4A; and declaring an emergency.
Body
PREAMBLE:
In December 2018, the King County regional affordable housing task force found that the region needs an additional 44,000 homes affordable for very low- and extremely low-income households over the next five years.
Additional funding is required to address the urgent need for affordable housing in King County.
In November 2015, King County declared a state of emergency to address the homelessness crisis.
Approximately 4,500 households receiving homeless services in King County are experiencing chronic homelessness.
Studies show that people experiencing chronic homelessness experience more negative physical health, lower behavioral health outcomes and victimization.
Studies show the costs of permanent supportive housing for these households is far less than the crisis system costs from these households experiencing homelessness.
One-room settings, in particular permanent affordable housing with supportive services, are proven to improve health outcomes and housing stability and reduce crisis system use.
As of September 14, 2020, nearly 200,000 Americans had died from COVID-19.
Persons living in congregate shelters are particularly vulnerable to rapid spread of airborne disease like COVID-19 because persons living in congregate shelters are disproportionately persons of color, are older than average and experience higher rates of underlying health conditions, and are by definition without a safe place in which to observe social distancing and best practices of hygiene.
The Regional Action Framework identified a need for 6,500 additional units of supportive housing for people experiencing chronic homelessness.
In 2019, only 38 percent of adult Medicaid enrollees with an identified need for substance use disorder treatment in King County and statewide received trea...

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